The incredible journey of one indie horror filmmaker

Meet Brad Leo Lyon. He’s an indie horror movie director who described his body of work with such perfectly wry humor that I wanted to directly quote him. He says:

“This is director Brad Leo Lyon, [whom] you may not remember from such movies as Little Creeps (starring Dustin Diamond, Lark Voorhies, Joe Estevez, Robert Z’Dar, Jake the Snake Roberts) and Monsters on Main Street (Todd Bridges, Robert Z’Dar, Martin Klebba).

Nope, I didn’t type that wrong.

My typical films usually left theaters before the majority of people could buy a ticket, was broadcast so late most people were in bed, [or] were buried so deeply into the cheap bin at Walmart you would have had to dive in to find it. “

Brad Leo Lyon

In 2015, Brad was well into production for his next feature film, “Thursday the 12th” when tragedy hit his family. His mother passed away followed a few months later by his father. He took a few years to heal. And currently, he’s back in the director’s chair, with a determination to create the projects he’s passionate about, motivated by the memory of his incredibly supportive parents.

Both my parents loved horror movies, my mother especially.

I wanted to know more about him and what motivated him to keep at it. So we spoke a little about his parents.

Interview with Brad Lyon

Jeanette: What did your parents think of your horror movie projects?

Brad: I grew up in a horror loving household. Both my parents loved horror movies, my mother especially. She wasn’t necessarily as in love with some of the campier ones that I enjoyed like Killer Klowns from Outer Space and Evil Dead but she definitely liked a good scare from Hellraiser. Freddy was her favorite character, as long as Robert Englund was portraying him that is. […] Going to the movies together was one of our favorite family activities; one we did often […] If there was a horror film playing that week you better believe we were the first in line to see it.

Jeanette: Did your parents ever get involved with your productions?

Brad: My mother and father were constantly involved in my life since I was little. […] Growing up they made it to every single sports game or event I participated in. Mind you, there was many of them. From wrestling to football, power-lifting to track and field they always seemed to find a way to make it. […]

When my football career wasn’t exactly taking off full steam, my father and I partnered on a professional minor league team. He came out of retirement to help me run it and my mother supervised the operations of every game, ran the concessions, and basically took care of everything happening off the field.

Thus, it was no surprise that when my career became film, so did theirs. My father and mother were producers on nearly every film I did. Beyond that though, my mother production supervised nearly every set and handled catering and craft services while my father unit production managed.

When my career became film, so did theirs.

I’ll tell you what, both were brilliant at what they did too. No one was better with people than my father and I cannot tell you a soul I know tougher than my little 4’11 mom who made sure things were getting handled.

Due to my mother’s health, Thursday the 12th was the first feature I produced and directed that she was not on set full time. Both of them missed a bit of production. As a matter of fact, the last time I saw my mother alive was a visit to set my mom and dad made while we were filming. The next thing I know I had my dad knocking on the door of my hotel room door because he was unable to reach me by phone to tell me she had passed away. 

That’s the one visit you never expect to have at your hotel room door. Thursday the 12th became the hardest film for me to ever complete due in part to that moment.


I don’t know if I would personally ever have the strength to return to a project so closely tied to a moment, but Brad does and he did. After a break, he returned to “Thursday the 12th,” and it will be coming out in Spring 2020.

But that’s not actually what I’m here to talk about.

His Next Big Project

Brad is continuing to make his dreams a reality and has launched an IndieGoGo to help make his next project a reality. His pitch video had me literally cry-laughing with it’s “casual infomercial” vibe and 4th wall breaking.

Killer Keg’s official IndieGoGo pitch video

If Killer Keg hits even half of the self-aware humor that this pitch video did, it’s going to be hilarious. http://bit.ly/KillerKegIndieGoGo

About Killer Keg

Killer Keg is currently scheduled to start filming in Florida this January through February. It’s a full-blown passion project for Brad as its the first narrative feature film he will be directing after both of his parents passed away.

Killer Keg is the new horror comedy from indie director Brad Leo Lyon filming this winter on the Sun Coast of Florida. It’s Groundhog Day meets Happy Death Day as a group of friends decide to throw a kegger to cheer up a friend after his girlfriend dumps him. Problem? Well, the mysterious keg they find for the party causes them to relive the same day over and over again and with each new day another person disappears. 

The IndieGoGo is live and needs your help to to hit goal.

Let’s show Brad just how supportive the horror community can be.

Please help this project meet it’s goal by donating and/or sharing the project! Killer Keg Indie Go Go

Every little bit of support helps. And I for one, really want to see more from this passionate filmmaker.

When his next film hits theaters, I want to be there for it. In line for the late night showing at the bottom of the Walmart discount bin.

When his next film hits theaters, I want to be there for it. In line for the late night showing at the bottom of the Walmart discount bin. http://bit.ly/KillerKegIndieGoGo

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